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Lesson34- Introduction To Grips

Up to now you have been invoking a command BEFORE selecting 
objects to edit. you can also select objects when no command is running and THEN select the desired edit operation to use. Left-click on objects when no command is running to select objects one at a time (or use implied Crossing or Window tools). When objects are selected and no command is running you can right-click in the drawing area to invoke a shortcut menu. one section of this Read More...

Lesson33- ROTATE

Use Rotate to revolve objects about a base point by an angle. you can type the required angle at the keyboard or you can move your cursor & drag the revolved objects to the desired location then left-click to use the displayed orientation. Positive angles normally rotate objects in a counter-clockwise direction (opposite to the image shown in the Rotate toolbar button) some drawings may use clockwise directions for positive angles (use Help to learn more about the ANGDIR system Read More...

Lesson32- SCALE

Use Scale to change the size of selected objects by a specified scale factor about a base point. the scale factor can be entered as a value at the keyboard. you can also use your cursor to drag the selected objects and then left-click when they are the desired size. scale factors less then 1.0 make objects smaller whereas scale factors greater then 1.0 make objects larger. the base point is important because objects grow away from or shrink Read More...

Lesson31- MOVE & COPY

Use Move to move selected objects by a displacement. AutoCAD prompts for a base point and a second point then calculates the required displacement automatically. if you know the displacement you can enter it as X,Y at the first prompt & then press <enter> at the second point prompt. Command: MOVE ↵ Select objects: (use selection tools) Specify base point or displacement: (Base point) Specify second point of displacement or <use first point as displacement>: (2nd point) Command: Use Copy to Read More...

Lesson30- Basic Selection Tools

Edit commands will eventually prompt you to Select objects. your crosshairs turn into a pickbox when you see the Select objects prompt on the command line. you can hold your pickbox over the desired object and press your left mouse button (left-click) to select an object. You can change your pickbox size to suit your preferences by invoking the Options command & picking the Selection tab If you have crowded drawings it is best to use a smaller pickbox 
(but Read More...

Lesson29- Using ERASE To Delete Objects

Erase is one of the most common edit commands and you will use it to practice using basic selection tools in the next section. When you Erase (Clear) a set of objects they are removed from the drawing and sent to a temporary buffer. if you would like those erased objects back in the same drawing session you can recall them by typing the Oops command. this buffer is updated each time you use Erase so you can only recall Read More...

Lesson28- Introduction To ELLIPSES & SPLINES

You can create an ELLIPSE object using the Ellipse command and there are several different methods to create them. the default method lets you create an ELLIPSE by supplying any three end points of the major and minor axes. if you know the center point and an one end point of each axis you can use the Center option instead. you can create part of an ELLIPSE using the Arc option
(or you can use the Trim command on a Read More...

Lesson27- Creating & Using POINT

A POINT is a one dimensional object that can be used to mark special coordinates in a drawing. for example, you might see POINTs with TEXT labels beside them to list elevations at various coordinates in site plans. you can also snap to POINTs using the Node osnap so POINTs can be an effective construction object as well. One way to create a POINT is to use the Point command. if you invoke Point with the toolbar button you will Read More...

Lesson26- Introduction To POLYLINES

PLINE PL (alias) D r a w + Polyline Draw One way to create a LWPOLYLINE is to use the Pline command. Pline (an abbreviation for PolyLINE) is used to create single objects that can be made up of multiple LINE & ARC segments. as an example, the shape below could be made from 9 individual LINEs & one ARC or it could be made from one LWPOLYLINE. Prior to AutoCAD Release 14 the Pline command created POLYLINE objects but now these objects Read More...

Lesson25- Creating CIRCLES & ARCS

CIRCLE C (alias) D r a w + Circle + [Option] Draw You can use the Circle command and select command line options manually to create CIRCLEs using different methods or you can pre-select the method that you want to use from the AutoCAD automatically supplies appropriate responses to prompts when you use a pulldown menu to invoke Circle. the same Circle command is used for all pulldown menu options. Draw + Circle cascading pulldown menu. For example, you could pick Draw + Read More...

Lesson24- Creating LINE Objects

One Line command can be used to draw a 2D shape comprised of many straight-edged segments. even if segments are created in the same Line command it is important to realize that each segment is a separate object. For example, the following simple 2D drawing would require 16 separate LINE objects to model the three views for this bracket but you could create all of these 16 LINE objects using 5 (or more) separate Line commands. You have already been using Read More...

Lesson23- User & World Coordinate Systems

The World Coordinate System (WCS) is the default coordinate system used by AutoCAD. the WCS will be sufficient for most of your 2D drafting needs and this is the only coordinate system used in this course. you know that the current coordinate system is the WCS when you see the letter W in the UCS icon. If you plan to work with 3D drawings or with drawings that are oriented at an odd angle (e.g. site plans not square to Read More...

Lesson22- Inquiry Tools For Points

You can use the Id command to find coordinates and this tool is usually used with an osnap. for example, you might want to find the coordinates for the center of an existing CIRCLE. you would invoke Id and then use a Center osnap to select the desired CIRCLE. Command: '_id Specify point: CEN↵ 
of (select CIRCLE) X = 3.0000 Y = 3.0000 Z = 0.0000 
 You can use Dist to find the distance between two points and this tool is also Read More...

Lesson21- Using Snap & Grid

When you turn On the GRID in the status bar you will see an array of dots on your screen at a fixed spacing in the X and Y directions. you can use the GRID as a visual frame of reference and the dots in your GRID will not appear when you Plot. the GRID is displayed ONLY in the drawing Limits area. you may not see the GRID when you are zoomed out if the 
space between each Read More...

Lesson20- Using POLAR With Direct Distance Entry

You can use the POLAR tool in AutoCAD in the same way that you would use a T-square when you make drawings manually. When POLAR is On in the status bar your next point can be constrained vertically or horizontally. hold your crosshairs approximately in a vertical direction from 
your last point to constrain your next point vertically. hold your crosshairs approximately in a horizontal direction from 
your last point to constrain your next point horizontally. otherwise your next point Read More...

Lesson19- Running Object Snaps

An object snap override is ONLY valid for the next point you pick. it is more efficient to use running osnaps (instead of overrides) to use the same osnap mode(s) for several points. for example, you could have set a running osnap for Endpoint to complete the previous exercise with less effort in less time.You can select the desired osnap mode to set as a running osnap by using the Dsettings command. check the desired mode in the Object Read More...

Lesson18- Object Snap Overrides

An Osnap (short for Object SNAP) lets you snap onto geometric positions of objects when AutoCAD prompts you to pick a point. this lets you draw objects precisely without having to determine (or even know) the required coordinates. osnaps are one of the most important drafting tools to learn. One way to use an osnap is to type the first 3 letters (abbreviation) 
of the desired osnap mode when AutoCAD prompts for a point. For example, suppose you wanted to draw Read More...
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